Tank Vs Tankless Water Heater – How To Decide Which Is Better

Whether you’re redoing your house or you just have to replace the water heater, it’s important to avoid going by the ear, but do your homework instead. There are both tank and tankless water heaters on the market and just like you’ve probably guessed already, they come with both pros and cons. Now, what are the most important things to know before making a decision?

Tankless Water Heaters

Understanding Tankless Water Heaters

Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand. They work with electric coils or gas, depending on the model. They do have some limitations in terms of flow and output. For example, it’s not too efficient to take a shower, do laundry and have your partner do the dishes at the same time, as the flow might be reduced. Generally speaking, gas tankless water heaters work faster than their electric alternatives. You can check out these superb gas heaters reviews from Verellenhc.

Benefits of Tankless Water Heaters

Tankless water heaters represent a new trend these days, mostly because of the positive aspects they come with. When compared to their tank alternatives, they usually last about two times longer on average.

They don’t require tanks to operate, which means you don’t have to find space for a large bulky appliance in your kitchen or bathroom. Instead, you can use the respective space for something else. Keep in mind that tank heaters can normally take between 40 and 80 gallons of water – lots of space.

Above all these benefits, most homeowners would choose tankless water heaters for the cost efficiency. They do cost more to install, but they pay for themselves due to the money you can save. Simply put, you no longer require to have a full tank of water at all times. There is no waste, as these units heat water on demand. The savings will reflect on your utility bill from the first month.

Drawbacks of Tankless Water Heaters

There aren’t too many minuses associated with tankless water heaters, apart from the fact that they cost more to purchase and install. Luckily, this drawback is insignificant because you’ll make up the difference with the longterm savings.

Tank Water Heaters

Understanding Tank Water Heaters

Most tank water heaters can take between 40 and 80 gallons of hot water, yet you may also find smaller models. They are large and require some space. While they’re cheaper to install than tankless heaters, they have one major disadvantage in terms of convenience – if you finish the hot water, you’ll have to wait until the heater produces more.

Benefits of Tank Water Heaters

The low upfront cost is certainly a plus, while the installation is simple and inexpensive. The system is classic and proven to work, especially if you face an emergency – you know there’s always some hot water in the tank.

Drawbacks of Tank Water Heaters

The standby loss is basically an energy waste – you waste money for keeping a full tank of hot water. The lifespan can barely go up to 10 years, not to mention the inconvenience of running out of hot water in the middle of action.

Conclusion

Bottom line, it’s easy to tell why tankless water heaters gain so much popularity. Sure, tank water heaters have their own “audience” as well, but more and more homeowners switch to the cost efficient alternative.

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